Hey Sailor!

16 02 2011
Specific Cares Required

AQUA watersex watersex
  • If you have any kind of sex in open water, make sure all players are good swimmers.
  • Check here for sex in public.
  • Water washes away natural lubricants (from the body).
  • Water degrades latex.
  • Oil based lubes degrade latex, as do other oil based substances like sunscreen, tanning lotion, bath oils, bubble bath, soap and shampoo.
  • Silicone lubricant is the best to use as it is not water soluble (will not be washed away in water).
  • There has been little research into the effectiveness of condoms underwater. That said, it seems silicone lube on a latex condom is the best.
  • As it is water-resistant, silicone lubricants may be difficult to wash off (your body, clothes, sheets).
  • Make sure condoms/gloves are put on dry skin.
  • It is a lot more likely a barrier will slip off; holding it in place will decrease this risk.
  • Any kind of penetrative (front or back) sex in water containing chlorine or bacteria makes abrasions, irritation and infection a lot more likely. High risk: thrush, UTI. This risk is higher for people with a vagina.
  • For sex in shower/bath: invest in a nonslip mat. Having something to hold onto is also a plus (like a bar installed).

[About ContraceptionAsk Men]

Our complete safer sex guide is here.





Bloodplay

15 02 2011

Specific Cares Required

MAROON cuts bleeds
PURPLE piercer piercee
  • Any activities involving blood carry a higher risk for Hepatitis C, HIV and other blood born viruses.
  • Using new equipment, wearing gloves and keeping the procedure sterile dramatically reduces the risk of transmitting bacteria and viruses.
  • Make sure there’s an experienced player involved (rather than 2 novices going at it for the first time).
  • You can’t learn this stuff from text, you need to learn it from a professional or experienced player.
  • On piercing, see Deborah Addington’s Play Piercing or Instigator Magazine 21.
  • Any blood spills should be cleaned up using bleach or alcohol and detergent solutions.
  • Blood on sheets or clothing should be washed with an antibacterial detergent (bleach/napisan).
  • Infection usually comes from foreign sweat or lube entering the open wound. Treat and dress wounds immediately after cutting/piercing.

[Consensual SadomasochismInstigator MagazinePlay PiercingSports Medicine Australia]

Our complete safer sex guide is here.





Keep it Clean

12 02 2011

Sex Toys/Dildos

PINK, Light dildo wielder dildo fuckee

How to be safer: Use a new condom for every partner or orifice. Wash toys after (and/or before) use. Safest: Keep a separate toy for each partner and yourself.

Cleaning sex toys: Porous toys (made from jelly, rubber, PVC, vinyl, or Cyberskin) can be cleaned (with soap and water) but not completely disinfected. Always use a condom with porous toys. Nonporous toys (made from silicone, acrylic, glass or metal) can be disinfected:

  • Silicone: hot water and anti-bacterial soap, sex toy cleaner, diluted bleach solution (10:1 water-to-bleach), boiled for 5-10 minutes
  • Acrylic: hot water and anti-bacterial soap, diluted bleach solution (dry with soft cloth, paper towel can scratch them)
  • Glass: hot water and anti-bacterial soap, diluted bleach solution, alcohol
  • Metal and other materials: see manufacturer’s instructions.

Also

  • Make sure that DIY sex toys are safe by ensuring they are not brittle, do not have sharp edges and are able to be cleaned easily and often

[ACONOpening Up]

Our complete safer sex guide is here.





Effective Barrier Use

12 02 2011

Gloves/Dams/Condoms

The effective use of barriers in the following activities greatly reduces possible transmission by preventing the transfer of infected fluids or by covering an infected site.

Possible risks even with barrier useHPV, BV, TV, thrush, herpes, hep B, chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis

WHITE jerk me off I’ll do us both
BLUE, Robin’s Egg 69 69
BLUE, Light gives oral wants oral
——— BLUE, Light
w/ light PINK stripe
sucks dildo suck my dildo
——— BLUE, Light w/ MAROON stripe gives head to menstruator wants head, is bleeding
BLUE, Navy fucking / TOP fucking / BOTTOM
RED, Dark 2-handed fister 2-handed fistee
RED fist fucker fist fuckee
PINK, Light dildo wielder dildo fuckee
BEIGE rimmer rim me
  • Make sure you have the right size (a tight fit) for gloves and condoms. Different brands have different sizes.
  • You can make dams from unlubricated condoms by cutting them up one side. Extra thin condoms tend to provide more stimulation than dams. You can make a tongue condom from a glove: cut the wrist and fingers off (leaving the thumb in tact), then cut up the side where the pinkie was. This tends to afford the highest sensitivity to both giver and receiver.
  • Ensure barriers are within their use-by date (they degrade over time and are thus more likely to break).
  • Make sure it is not torn when removed from packaging.
  • Coloured gloves are awesome because you can have a different colour for each hand.
  • Double glove for the convenience of moving from back to front play (just whip off the outer glove).
  • With condoms: if relevant, pull back the foreskin. Squeeze the air out of the tip (you can also place a small amount of lube on the inside tip of the condom to reduce air bubbles and increase sensitivity) and roll the condom all the way down.
  • For oral sex/rimming, lube can be put beneath the barrier for extra stimulation – but be aware that this makes it more likely to slip off.  With dams, mark each side with a different coloured marker to more easily keep track of the down and up sides.
  • Hold the barrier in place during use.
  • Check that the condom remains in tact throughout use. The more lube you use and the more frequently (while fucking), the less likely breakage is. When pulling out, hold the base of the condom to ensure it doesn’t slip off.
  • Use barriers only once. Use a different barrier for each person or orifice. Throw them in the bin after use.
  • Use water or silicone-based lube with latex condoms. Non-latex condoms tend to be made of silicone. Don’t use silicone condoms or lube on silicone dildos/toys. Oil based lubes (like hand cream or Vaseline) weaken latex condoms, causing them to break more easily.

Also:

  • Fisting and hand washing are more risky than fingering as the likelihood of tearing the lining of the vagina/anus is higher.
  • On cleaning sex toys.
  • Any activities involving blood carry a higher risk for Hepatitis C, HIV and other blood born viruses.
  • Condom guide

Our complete safer sex guide is here.





General Tips

9 02 2011

General Tips for Safer Play


Before Before play (Be Prepared!)

  • Clean all your sex toys/dildos.
  • Have ready access to barriers (condoms, gloves, dams) and lube.
  • Keep your fingernails short and smooth.
  • Maintain good oral hygiene.
  • Have an idea of your hard limits, and how you plan on avoiding them.
  • Know if you have any allergies (like latex).
  • Know your lube preferences, and how different lubes interact with different toys and parts of the body.
  • Know what agreement you have with a fluid-bondee for playing outside.

Before play

  • Be aware of cuts or scraps on your body, especially hands and mouth, and if you’re feeling sick.
  • “Sting test” your hands (and any other parts of your body that may come into contact with fluids): Sex fluids that carry infections can infect microcuts that might result from ordinary dry skin or abrasions of any sort, and are invisible to the naked eye. You can check skin for microcuts by splashing it with rubbing alcohol, lemon juice or vinegar: which will cause cuts to sting (frequent exposure to rubbing alcohol will dry the skin in a way that can cause damage).
  • Wash your hands with anti-bacterial soap.
  • Don’t brush your teeth or floss.
  • Take a piss.
  • Inform players of your allergies, lube preferences.
  • Look at other players hands, and if relevant, genitals for lesions.
  • Negotiate how you want to play. <LC: more info in link coming soon>

During play

  • The best way to decrease the risk of infection transmission is to prevent infected site contact and limit abrasions.
  • If relevant, make sure barriers are used effectively.
  • Avoid rubbing your/their eyes, especially if there’s been junk/butt/mouth touching.
  • Don’t move from back activity to front activity without a barrier change .
  • Consent. Checking in. <LC: more info in link coming soon>

After play

  • Throw any used barriers in a bin.
  • Wash your hands with anti-bacterial soap (or use hand sanitiser).
  • Take a piss, especially after IV.
  • Aftercare. <LC: more info in link coming soon>

Our complete safer sex guide is here. Where appropriate, further advice should be sought from a medical practitioner.





Location Location

8 02 2011


MOSQUITO NETTING outdoors outdoors
RED/WHITE GINGHAM parks parks
TOILET PAPER public toilets
(seeks service)
public toilets
(offers service)
  • Make sure your hands are clean (you can carry hand sanitiser). Give head rather than hand jobs. Safest: Use barriers.
  • Respect the space: take all rubbish (eg used barriers) with you.
  • You might be breaking the law if you are caught engaging in “offensive behaviour”. This includes exposing your genitals (including bum), or engaging in any sexual activity in public (which may include a car or a public toilet if the door is open).
  • Behaviour is not considered offensive if the observer has to take abnormal or unusual action to observe it (such as looking under a locked toilet cubicle door).
  • Go here for sex in water.

[takecare.org.au]

Our complete safer sex guide is here. Where appropriate, further advice should be sought from a medical practitioner.





On rejection

7 02 2011

[gauche]

Swiftly and graciously accepting rejection is a cornerstone of radical consent. It hurts, but if you really believe in sexual autonomy, you just have to suck it up — without pleading or wheedling or demanding answers. You need a reason to be with someone, not to reject them.

Of course, rejection can be based on prejudice. It can be cissexist or racist or fatphobic or biphobic or ageist or ableist or anti-virgin or whatever else. And if someone voices those sentiments, you’re right to call them up on it. But nobody owes you an explanation on why they don’t want to fuck you or date you. I’ve been hearing people assume prejudice in situations where no reason was given, and I tend to think it’s likely no reason was given because no one wants to say “I’m just not that into you”.

In an existing relationship, pressing for a reason can be used to get someone to stay with you under the promise that you will change. But though it’s widely acknowledged that rape and sexual assault occur within established relationships, conversations about consent can tend to focus on the beginnings of things. Even when consent education explicitly resists the idea of perpetual consent, or conclusive negotiations (eg in this questionnaire), people can assume that certain ideas or questions aren’t applicable to their situation. The communication style and power dynamic of an established relationship can complicate negotiations, as much as it can facilitate them.

But coercion can come from a place of disempowerment — eg using your body image or mental health issues to manipulate someone into having sex with you — as much as it can come from the abuse of power. When you feel utterly powerless, it can be hard to imagine that you’re exercising coercion, but that’s exactly what’s happening when you try to beg and trade in the face of rejection.

One of our Basic Rules of Flagging is that we need to be open to suggestion and open to rejection. Consent depends on both — if you are too polite to proposition, too precious to be propositioned, too evasive to reject and too insecure to be rejected, how are you negotiating consent?

 








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